How to formally address a member of the royal family or aristocrat from the UK

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How to formally address a member of the royal family or aristocrat from the UK
How to formally address a member of the royal family or aristocrat from the UK
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You need to meet a member of the British royal family or an English aristocrat - king, queen, prince, duke - and you want to know their status, how should you talk to them? How to contact them? How to introduce them to other people?

Steps

Method 1 of 1: Formally Addressing British Royals and Aristocrats

Formally Address British Royalty and Aristocracy in Person Step 1
Formally Address British Royalty and Aristocracy in Person Step 1

Step 1. Show respect to the royal family by bowing your head (not bowing to the waist) if you are a man and a little curtsy (you need to put your right foot behind your left heel and bend your knees slightly) if you are a woman

Bowing or curtsy is optional unless you are a citizen of the United Kingdom or the Commonwealth, and even so, these traditional gestures are not currently necessary. However, in any case, this is an acceptable courtesy.

  • Just shake hands with the queen if she holds out to you. If you are wearing gloves, do not remove them.
  • Do not start the conversation with the queen first. Instead, wait while she speaks to you herself.
Formally Address British Royalty and Aristocracy in Person Step 2
Formally Address British Royalty and Aristocracy in Person Step 2

Step 2. Complete your first response to the royal family member using the formal appeal

For example, if the prince asks you, "Do you like Great Britain?", You should answer: "She is beautiful, Your Royal Highness." Each title implies its own special treatment:

  • Kings and queens are addressed as "Your Majesty." Introduce them to those around them as "Her Royal Majesty" (not "Queen of England" as she is "Queen of the United Kingdom", "Queen of Canada" and many other titles).
  • For princes and princesses, call Your Royal Highness. Introduce them as "His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales". Any child or grandchild / granddaughter of male line is a prince or princess. The consort of a prince is also a princess, although she is not always "Princess Her First Name. A consort of a princess is not always a prince. Great-grandchildren in the male line of a monarch are not princes or princesses. They should be referred to as" lord "or" lady "such as" Lady Jane "and introduced her as "Lady Jane Windsor" (except when they have their own titles).
  • Dukes and Duchesses are referred to as "Your Grace" or "Duke / Duchess". The Duke is to be introduced as "His Grace the Earl of Norfolk", to the Duchess as "Her Grace the Duchess of Norfolk".
  • Baronets and knights, men, are addressed as "Sir Brian" (if his name is Brian Twights), and his wife "Lady Twights". You need to introduce him using his full name, "Sir Brian Twights" and the wife "Lady Twights".
  • Ladies of Cavalry (the equivalent of chivalry for women - there is no equivalent for the title of baronet) - "Dame Gertrude" when addressed, and she must be presented "Dame Gertrude Mellon".
  • Other titles (including Marquis / Marquis, Earls / Countesses, Viscounts / Viscountesses, Barons / Baronesses) are commonly referred to as "Lord or Lady Trowbridge" (for the Earl of Trowbridge) and must be represented using the appropriate title, such as "Viscount Sweet" or " Baroness Rivendell ".
Formally Address British Royalty and Aristocracy in Person Step 3
Formally Address British Royalty and Aristocracy in Person Step 3

Step 3. Subsequently, use the words "Sir" or "Madam" ("Ma'am")

If the titled person communicates in an informal manner, you can omit the words "Sir" or "Madam". Don't make them ask for it.

Advice

  • The order of priority of the British royal family and aristocracy is as follows (highest to lowest):
    • King / Queen
    • Prince / Princess
    • Duke / Duchess
    • Marquis / Marquise
    • Count / Countess
    • Viscount / Viscountess
    • Baron / Baroness
    • Baronet
    • Knight / Cavalier Lady
  • Usually you do not need to give to name the exact peerage title when you present it. The peer's wife can be represented as "Lady Trowbridge" (and not "Lady Honoria Trowbridge", which would mean that she still has titles that she inherited).
  • If someone tells you how he / she would like to be contacted, the basic rules can be forgotten.
  • This is especially true of the highest titles, since their surname often differs from the title. In such cases, never reproduce this option: "Title Surname" (although the son or daughter of a peer may have the title Lord / Lady Surname).
  • You can find a more complete list by typing "contact forms" into the search bar.

Warnings

  • At the same time, if you need to ask a question, it is better to first ask a friend of lower rank or a protocol referent about it.
  • The distinction between monarchs and titleholders by inheritance stems from the hierarchical class system and helps slightly to perpetuate this system. If you strongly reject this system, you can avoid "royal treatment" to them. On the other hand, however, it is better to be polite and courteous. In addition, many British peers have received their titles of merit; they may not be directly related to the hereditary aristocracy.
  • If you haven't prepared in advance, it may be best to sound a little clueless rather than trying to "improvise".
  • This article deals with meetings with British lords and aristocrats. In other parts of the world, their representatives of the nobility. And while the official website of the British Royal Family states that when meeting with a member of the royal family, "It is not necessary to follow a code of conduct - just a simple courtesy", this rule may not apply when it comes to aristocrats of other countries. In some countries, you can be severely punished for not following the code of conduct.

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